All Heart with Paul Cardall

Saving tiny Hearts on All Heart with Paul Cardall

Episode Summary

Host Paul Cardall was born with congenital heart disease, which is the leading cause of infant related deaths. Brian Paul founded the Saving tiny Hearts Society 501 c(3) to raise funds for medical research to ensure millions of children born with CHD have a future.

Episode Notes

Host Paul Cardall was born with congenital heart disease, which is the leading cause of infant related deaths. Brian Paul founded the Saving tiny Hearts Society 501 c(3) to raise funds for medical research to ensure millions of children born with CHD have a future.  Brian shares some of the advancements in medical research and the various projects helping families affected by CHD take comfort knowing cardiologists are working overtime to help preserve life.  Also discussed is Brian's approach to fundraising and the incredible success they've had year after year through their grassroots efforts. 

Learn more about Saving tiny Hearts by visiting https://savingtinyhearts.org/ and purchased the Saving tiny Hearts album by Paul Cardall because a portion of the sales helps fund CHD research. Get the album

Episode Transcription

- [Announcer] Hey, everybody. Welcome to the American Songwriter Podcast Network. This is All Heart with Paul Cardall.

 

- Welcome to this special edition of All Heart, I'm your host Paul Cardall. It's special because we're gonna be speaking with the founder, Brian Paul of Saving tiny Hearts Society. This is one of the best fundraising charities making such a huge difference in the lives of thousands of people affected by congenital heart disease. This is the number one infant related cause of death. I've spoken about this many times. I'm a survivor. I got the heart transplant over 10 years ago, which was kind of like the finale of all these surgeries that I had had throughout my life. You know, it's like I used to have this beat up old truck that everybody had driven. Grandpa had passed it down. It was rusty, it was gross. But it was a beautiful, beautiful truck everybody lived. That was my old damaged, defective heart that I was born with. And imagine them saying to you, you got to turn that in, what you got, all that nostalgia of grandpa and everything. Where you go to turn that in and they give you the keys to a Porsche. That's how I felt after getting my heart transplant. You know, I have full oxygen levels in my brain. It's almost like my body's completely rewired. It's been amazing to have this new heart and it only happened because of medical research, advancements in technology and the funding that it takes to do these things. After the transplant so many people, so many people, you. I know many of you prayed for me to be alive and there were so many people that contributed to our family, there was a fundraiser that I wanted to figure out how to give back. And so, I was actually in the intensive care unit recovering from the transplant when a friend of mine says, let's do a concert at Abravanel Hall. This was ambitious because this is the symphony hall and the most popular place to hear a symphony in Utah. And I hadn't played it yet. So I didn't even think I could sell 1,000 seats. We planned the concert. It was amazing, everybody came. It was one of the most inspiring events. We raised $65,000. We took that money and we gave it to the Salt Lake Community College to create an endowment so that there could be scholarships for people affected by congenital heart disease. And why did I choose that? It's I know a lot of people that because of their chronic illness they aren't sure if they're going to live, they're not sure what their situation is. And so they don't have goals. They don't necessarily always focus. And I want it to be one to say, listen, you can survive, change your mindset, let's focus on getting an education. But then you have all these medical bills. So how are you supposed to pay for college? That's why we did this. We want to help. And you can find out about this scholarship on my website, paulcardall.com. Those of you that are in the Utah Area or surrounding those areas, it is a full ride scholarship available to you who are affected by congenital heart disease. Well, after that, I realized that's just one drop in the bucket. What else can be done? That's when I met Francie, who is the wife of Brian. Francie and Brian Paul invited me out to Chicago to host a GALA. And I didn't know about Saving tiny Hearts. but that night I learned not only is this the best couple in the world that knows how to organize a GALA that is so interesting and so impactful. That I tell everybody that if you're gonna pull off a GALA, you got to first go to this one and learn how it's done. But secondly, they have a son who had been born with congenital heart disease. And they were so unsure of his future, that they went to battle and they started Saving tiny Hearts. And we're gonna talk all about this and how their fundraising, some of the events they have coming up. But we're gonna talk about this amazing group of people that have congenital heart disease. You are my family, my blood brothers, my blood sisters, and it's so good to be alive. So sit back, relax and listen to this amazing interview we recorded last week. This is Brian Paul.

 

- Champion fella.

 

- How you doing brother?

 

- Good, how are you doing?

 

- Good to see you. You get everything squared away. It looks quiet.

 

- It's not quiet but we'll do our best. Not quiet, Francie is upstairs. I'm sure she's gonna drop in a little bit later. But trying to get ready. A dog is right in here, I'm there's gonna be a kid or two walking in and dog barking any minute.

 

- In all my years of living with congenital heart disease, for those listening. There have been countless organizations that have aggressively tried to prevent further deaths of infants because congenital heart disease is the number one cause of infant related deaths. We have a million children, approximately a million children born every year in the world with some form of defect. And most of these require immediate surgery or eventually in their lifetime, they will require surgery. I had the three major surgeries that most children born with a complex defect have. And there's, I guess what, Brian, there's like over 40, there's so many different kinds of defects. It's like buying a house with an unusual sprinkler system and then trying to get a guy to come in and try to fix

 

- I don't think much has changed from when we first met in terms the discussions we've had. In terms of the difficulties in the market, for lack of a better term or why we're doing what we're doing and where medicine is heading. I think it's very consistent.

 

- So do you feel like we're funding a band-aid or are we funding solutions?

 

- No, No, I think it's very full removing. I think that the future, I think the future of all medicine is tissue engineering. I still very aggressively going to the, I think that's realistic to get to a point where there's where we're growing our own organs and specifically a heart as a very heavily favorite organ to grow. It's complicated, but it's nothing like growing some of the other organ.

 

- What?

 

- It's success at it.

 

- Has there been other organs that have been developed yet? I mean, I don't think we've seen any organs yet developed.

 

- They've tissued engineered, for implantation very small stuff pieces, things like that. I mean, they've grown years and things like that, for sure. Now where they're able to do more structural . But we find it something back in probably about 10 years ago. It was the beginning of this. There was a doctor in Minnesota who actually went to Texas. She's a leader in this field in Texas. And they've actually down there cloned a, I think they might have cloned a human heart that had some faint beating but nothing that would be clinical whatsoever. But they're getting there. And then we funded one in Chicago and that doctor eventually moved to Maryland for a very similar type of endeavor. That one he cloned, he actually did call it a rabbit heart as part of our experiment. We funded him two years in a row, with beating in our lab, we have videos everybody saw it. So in that direction. But the ultimate, our victory is to be able to grow organs from your own DNA.

 

- Yeah. I know when I had my front turn, actually the endocarditis I had. An endocarditis is an infection on the heart. And this was on the precise spot that I had been born with abnormally. And when I went to go have the surgery to remove that, they discussed, you know, do we put in a synthetic, a material? And they said, if we do that he probably will not survive very much in order for us to do the front turn. And so, they took a vein, they took natural tissue out of my leg. They took a vein, they cut it halfway through, they laid it flat. They wrapped it around a tube and they sewed it shut. So it was a literal tube created out of the tissue of my body, my DNA. And so, but I mean the idea of growing a human heart... I mean, during that process when I was waiting for a heart, they said, or even early on, they were like, you know, let's get some DNA sample, let's get some tissue of your heart, cause maybe we can eventually grow that. The question was, how far are we from actually pulling that off? Cause that's so--

 

- Well, thank . I mean, the people on our medical advisory board do better indicating where an AP could actually start to become clinical. I don't know if you remember, I think we're within a year or two of age at each other. back in the 80s there was baby Fe got the mechanical . Got a mechanical heart back in the day. It was a failure, but it was the thing that people couldn't even imagine something. But they've come so far from back then. And yours I think. It's getting there, getting in there a lot. I think Dr. Wall who is on our board of directors, was the head of our medical advisory board for awhile. He could better indicate something like that. But this is absolutely where . The therapies have gotten tremendous. As you and I have talked about in the past the biggest hurdle right now we hear from a lot of people who are in between your age and Joshua's age is that, late teens, early twenties and not having a doctor to go to, that entire field of medicine, there's a void. And it actually still as I'm still hearing Haley was saying, now I remember her. He was talking about, she just went back. I think she's back at a pediatrician now. She's 25. Because the doctors were not able to accommodate what she needs and just don't understand what she has to get her to where she is.

 

- Yeah, and this is one of the biggest problems that we're talking about. Is when you turn 18, you'd have special care in the children's hospitals and they watch you. But then you hit that 18 it's like, you got to go to the adult hospital. But there hasn't been enough education for them. The basic cardiologists do not understand the complexities. It's a specialty. So you get to the university hospitals and the County hospitals, and they send in the guy to look at your heart, the echo, the girl becomes in to look at your echo. And it's like, I had this happen to me in a small town. They just could not help but wanna study the heart for hours on end because I never seen anything alike it. No one ever educated them, no one told them. And so you go and you live in these communities and you have a child with congenital heart disease that complicates things.

 

- I'm letting my dog out. I tell you what, you're lucky to have grown up where you did and we're very fortunate to live where we are where there's medicine that's in the front wave of the wave and imagine all the people that don't have access.

 

- Yeah.

 

- Medicine is not equal in the country. It's not a matter of where there are political issues. In reality, there's only one best then there's only a handful of the top tier doctors. There's a bunch of doctors don't have that information or have that experience and just that tier. So the best medicine, you're so lucky to have grown up in a like you did and we're in Chicago and . That's why we do what we do, the fund medicine. We're funding around the world. We funded now in four, five countries, something like that. And we want the best medicine to be out there, the best therapies. Hence, the things we can come up with that are relevant.

 

- What are some of the recent research projects you guys have funded that have completely changed the way of doing things?

 

- Boy, this is, it's funny you asked me that, I'm probably the wrong person to ask that. And I say that because... And the estimate I tell to what I love about our organization is we don't have any say in where the money goes. It is absolutely a medical advisory board 100% that dictates if they're completely autonomous. They make recommendations and we fund what they say. That it is so engineered and so complex is that, I mean, I'm understanding a little bit of it, but it's very, very complex parties that they're doing. We did find a couple of years ago at Ohio State, we funded a wide kids. It's not very relatable to why kids collapse on sports fields and undetected artifacts. We did fund a study on that. And so that was one that was something that everybody can understand. A lot of what we do is a DNA work to understand can we forecast what's gonna happen so they can do therapies very early on. We did fund the heart tissue growing one a few years back. On our website all of them are listed.

 

- Yeah, I'm seeing 2019 you guys funded about 524. Well, half a million dollars, plus an additional 75,000 for research in genetics with congenital heart disease, therapy for fatal arrhythmia in babies, mothers identifying genetics. I mean, this is all the nerdy stuff that these guys understand. And I've sat in those meetings when they decide and review. You know, having used to be on the board, I'd sit in those meetings and watch these guys decide what was, I guess the best option to fund. Because you got countless projects these guys all wanna do. They all wanna get ahold of some money.

 

- We all know the money scarce. The government is definitely cutting back on research. And what we do is very rare. There's not a lot of people who are funding congenital heart defect research. Congenital heart defects is not a very desirable place for corporations to put their money. They don't put it there. They put it at , they put it on unhealthy lifestyle type heart issues, late in life heart issues. Because the population is much bigger. Most people in the country will end up having it. So they put their money there. Where you are the anomaly, absolutely, when you were growing up kids they get to 18 , it exists. Or Asians back then weren't putting any money research or therapies or medicine. Neither money wasn't there, just the kids weren't living. So it wasn't worth, the population wasn't there to make me the best bad, but it's just the reality. So all the money went there. And now it's stopped to do much, much better now. The average life of kids, age bands from when you were growing up to now is double triple. And the medicine has come a far, far, far away since then. There's a lot more to do, there's a lot more to do.

 

- There's a ton to do. I mean, you constantly having children born with an abnormality. But the thing that's amazing is, when I was born, my mother had, there was no detection in the womb, where now you can detect in the wound whether your child is going to have a defect. Did you guys know when Joshua--

 

- Nope, they missed it.

 

- They missed it.

 

- This is actually the story of our entire founding at Saving tiny Hearts. I don't know if you recall this, Francie's doctor . Francie's doctor was a typical North shore Chicago doctor, just very lazy. And they miss that Joshua has three chambers in his heart and hypothesis. So, after Josh was born four hours later, maybe he had turned to ash and blue, got rushed down to Memorial hospital and that's when we found out about this deep there. But as part of that, we're really upset is our first child. So we had to grow up overnight and actually went to go see a lawyer. Their laws in Illinois allowed or lawsuits based on this misdiagnosis I just said, but also just missing something that's this big. We weren't able to tell if Joshua was gonna have any impact of how they found it wouldn't be different. But he was without oxygen for several hours of his life, could have been downtown at a NICU, in the ICU when he was born, he wasn't . So we didn't know. But anyway, we went to go see the power brokers down in the city that the big time now sat in their office. One of the major players in Chicago wanted to take her case. And there was a, in Illinois, there's something called wrongful life, which is pretty easy if you know what that is. We walked out of there and Francie and I were in the elevator. And, like, this is not for us. Something like this let's posit as opposed to something negative. So I literally pull out my phone called my corporate attorney for normal business. And I said, hey, how do we start a charity, because Joshua's surgeon told us there's a scarcity for money. Every parent wants to know what can we do to help. Everybody says, I wanna help, I wanna just... That's a normal instance but we actually did it. And called lawyer, said how do we start a charity? And literally came up with it and started. Pretty much in the elevator on the way out. That's actually how we started. It had, had they not missed Joshua had, I don't know if we'd hear today.

 

- It's all been grassroots funding--

 

- Yeah, 100%.

 

- Your community and people from around the country that have gotten involved. Bret Baier, the anchor at Fox News is involved. What was the connection there? How was Bret--

 

- Bret Baier and Haley Allen who, you know, Haley and Bret's wife come from the same community in the Chicago suburbs. It just been a bunch of people out that way. And I think that's how we made it. I'm pretty sure it came through... But Bret Baier has been wonderful, very nonpolitical, and he's not political, I'd say . But we're not a political organization in any way we have people spectrum. like any disease. It doesn't discriminate on.

 

- Sure.

 

- That's been absolutely wonderful. We have Charles Tillman, Chicago bear now in the FBI, very involved, wonderful, wonderful man. Tom Riles, who was very connected and Hollywood and that certainly .

 

- Tommy Riles, was he was just on a, well, he does the opening, he opens the audience for Ellen. So he was actually just on with his wife. They were just doing it--

 

- I heard, saw that.

 

- Yeah, they were doing a segment about that story. So I think, do you think by now people pretty much know about congenital heart disease, or do you think people are still worried about it?

 

- No, I think that we feel like everyone knows but when you've been around it so long and your life is surrounded by a huge .

 

- Yeah.

 

- And Joshua is young, so more people. We've met a couple more people. People are introduced cause my heart is like, but it's amazing just how people don't understand. And we hear all the time people are very involved in the organization. Probably the most common term I hear is we had no idea about this factor that . The thing that's difficult for our cost and all the, I love charity in general. One of the things that we say when we're doing age or speech somewhere that, even if someone's not gonna support our charity, the appraisal, we support a ton of other charities . The thing that's really hard about congenital heart defect,

 

- Your microphone keeps cutting out.

 

- Hear me now?

 

- Yeah.

 

- We are better or no?

 

- That's much better.

 

- So the thing that is very hard for us is that congenital heart kick back is just looking at, if you were to see Joshua now, he is a normal kid. You would no idea looking at him . Looking at you, you'd have no idea you went through what you did. We're not competing with cancer or down syndrome. Nothing to do with that. But there's signs when somebody even has cancer there's visually something you can see that as there might be that there's something on their. Down syndrome, very similar thing. But there's many, many causes where there's visual. Look at Joshua and you think that he is a perfectly healthy. you never know what the future's gonna bring. It's been tough and not... It's something we have to fight through, something that we really have to , we have to continue . We are the only organization that we know of in the country who raises money strictly for congenital heart defect research, we'll go over it . So there's another organization or two out there that does congenital heart defect research. One of the main ones had some major problems with the executive director. And we're avoiding all that. We keep it transparent, that's why earlier you said, where's our research going? What it was that funding? I should know and I'm embarrassed phone call. Because we're so transparent in terms of letting people do their jobs and oversight . Everything we do as an organization, my normal job, I'm a general contractor . Be the same practices we have there for oversight and a half billion to our company. We do the same and Tiny Hearts to make sure their transparency and theirs .

 

- The other thing that's fascinating with you guys is when you started, you had your first, I think your first GALA scenario, 2007 to 2009. There was $52,000 allocated, the following year 100,000 and then you stick, and we could talk money all day, but the actual number of research projects increased significantly with the more money you raise. You've gotten better at knowing how to grow the funds. So, I think a lot of, cause I've had a lot of people go, where's a GALA that we can go and observe and know how to do a GALA? And I always say, Saving tiny Hearts.

 

- Our GALA is the best. My wife Francie has, that's her thing. She started, she did the first one. Every year we learn more. We try not to make the same mistake twice. Everybody knows why they're there. We try to give just the amount of information there, let people really enjoy it. But the whole thing about the GALA is they have fun. We want people to enjoy being there. That's a tremendous fundraiser for us. And that it's my favorite event that got canceled for this year unfortunately.

 

- Sure.

 

- Getting pushed on that. The thing about what we do. You made a comment before, in 2007, we funded a project in eight, nine and so on, and then we raised more and more. Back then we did not have a medical advisory board, we just gave money. We started by giving money to a hospital and everybody thinks that their own hospitals has several things, from the doctors the best, their own lawyer is the best. Everyone thinks. And you should think that but the reality is that the best research is not necessarily being done in . It's done around the world. And that's why we actually just... Do you know the story of how our medical advisory board started? I didn't mean to segue .

 

- No, but I'm interested how that started.

 

- This is a great. So we had a little medical advisory board that started with some friends of the doctors at our hospital, kind of did , it wasn't a formal one. And this medical advisory board, the wonderful guys, but they were pushing the money like a good old boys network. And a lot of medical advisory boards ended up this way. And that was really, as I've learned now . So we had, and I hope Loren Wold watches this video because this is all about him. But he applied for a grant heard about us, and he was denied for his grant because he was--

 

- For those listening, Loren is a Head of Research at Ohio State.

 

- But Loren Wold is who's now on our board of directors, and then you'll hear that story in a second here. Loren is a very renowned researcher in the country, has got a bunch of labs at the Ohio State University. They're well-respected throughout the entire medical community in research of heart related topics. So, Loren actually doesn't get funded and he calls us out. He goes and reaches out to Larry Cruse, the chairman of our board and starts going. This is the first grant I have ever been denied. And he's very direct. He's not pompous and arrogant like that, but he's right. He was right in this case. And he goes your... I don't know, I shouldn't say any bad words. Try to throw it out here. Goes, your process is blondy, you're funding the same circle of people. We had no insight to that. This is very early on. This was a long, long time ago. This is a mistake so many people raising money and from hospital, which 50% goes to the house 50% goes to the project and the project might go out and go into overhead. It may just, people don't know where their money is going. That is a reality of what we do. But Loren calls up Larry and Larry calls him out back. And Larry goes, you don't like how we're doing it? Then put your money where your mouth is and head up our medical advice board where it show us how to do it. So we look at like, this minute our medical advisory board and the next day all going in and Loren brought in people from across the country. And he brought in NIH Type Protocols National Institute to help which is the benchmark of all research in the world. And so, now our medical advisory board is a, that was the grassroots of it and now we have all NIH protocols, how we judge it, how we do our review meetings. And so, it all started and Loren headed that up for handful years and he stepped off and we rotate that on purpose. So we don't get that mentality of being a good old boys network and rotate people on in a certain amount of time they can be on there. But Loren is actually now on our board of directors. And it all started from us thinking that we knew best on where to listen to the people directly in our lives on what to do with it. And that's how we ended up with our medical advisory board and a lovely Loren Wold .

 

- That's great. He's an amazing person what he's accomplished. And your website, savingtinyhearts.org shows all of the advisory board. And these are some of . So, Dr. Farah Sheik--

 

- She's at San Diego State. I believe she's in San Diego, I think San Diego State. She was on the board then she went to Pro Templar. And now she's the head of the medical advisor. Our website's getting Astro redone. We're rolling up into one in December. So please disregard the visuality out it's lacking and some of the content needs is stale right now. So the main thing on our website, literally, while we're not shutting it down now and putting a new one up, we have a fundraiser in December that we're signed up as on website right now for so. The medical advisory board .

 

- What's the number one lesson you've learned fundraising? What's that other people can apply when they go out there and try to say, you know, change the world?

 

- Oh, .

 

- What's one thing that you're glad that you discovered in fundraising and maybe one thing that just you wish you had known?

 

- Well, let me start by saying our organization specifically has something that a lot of organizations don't which is we are 100% volunteer base. You're not getting paid for something just to find the right group of people that are going to put in the necessary time. There's no accountability. If you don't do the job really can hear them. It's volunteer work. Hardest thing to do is the whole people accountable and do motivate them and to have people who have a like-minded or like-minded to have a common cause to don't learn from your mistakes. You have to have an open mind and really self-reflect and understand the things you've done that didn't work and learn from them and don't repeat them. And that's why our GALA is so good is we try not to repeat the same mistakes, learn from everyone. You know I used to know some really, really, really rich people that would help. We don't quite have that crowd yet but we're working on that.

 

- Yeah, that's a whole another world of fundraising that people try to tap into. And it's really, until they have somebody in their family and they probably do. It's just a matter of connecting to find out who has a child with congenital heart disease. I know cause early on your wife Francie started trying to find everyone that was somewhat of a celebrity who was known and brought them to the GALA--

 

- You know what? I take that back before. I was completely wrong and how we met Bret Baier. Can I jump in real quickly here? Totally screwed that up. So the people I'm getting to new Bret Baier, that's not how we found him. I had somebody from work, a steel subcontractor of mine. He sends me this article and on the front of People, this is after Joshua was born. And in front of People's Magazine is Bret Baier. And his son, Holly, was born with a congenital heart. So it had nothing to do with the people out as that was actually after the fact they introduced us to Haley was the exact opposite. So, and Francie the emails Bret Baier out of nowhere and says, tells them our story our son Joshua Paul, one of the congenital heart defect, we have a GALA coming up. We're very small at this time. We're not a mom and pop shopper. We're always bigger than we were at the time they were much more impressive than probably the organization as a whole. So she emails Bret Baier and Bret Baier respond. And he later tells a story a tell a story, tells that the GALA that he gets a thousand emails a year being asked to come speak at events. Cause he would like to respond to all of them and do all of them, but that's just not realistic. But there's something about this one that he goes homes and talks to his wife and he goes, Francie Paul has asked us to do something that's very near and dear and new in our lives to come to the GALA. He goes, my son is Paul Francis and Francie Paul has just emailed, is I get to sign. So Bret Baier, who was at the time, I mean, he's always, he's been there for a long, long time. He wasn't really coming to his own name. Ends up responding. He says, I'll be there. That's actually how we met Bret Baier with Francie. And Francie, that's what we pretty much need everyone is my wife just gets out there and she's really in very true and non fake way, just a very fair way. She is doing this for the right cause. That's how we met Bret Baier originally. It was Francie reaching out. And that whole Paul Francis, Francie Paul kind of thing.

 

- It's interesting because just the inner weaving of all of our lives and how we all kind of come in each other's lives. And you know, I learned about Matt Hamot and Sarah Hamot from Francie and now I'm in Nashville and Matt and I are in a small men's group we go to every Monday night. And it's interesting because I wouldn't have met that family who has a son with heart disease, had I not participated in this GALA. And you guys had, I think you had the Hamots at the last--

 

- Last year. Last year came, they each performance a song and it rocked the house. People absolutely love it. Just classy, classy people, just down to earth, wonderful human beings.

 

- Did you get a chance to see their documentary?

 

- I have not seen it. Their documentary? They did a documentary--

 

- They were filming it actually. Is the GALA in it? They had cameraman with them at the GALA actually. They were filming the whole thing, I didn't realize it was all put together. I knew they were doing a something there.

 

- It's the official selection of Nashville Film Festival. And they're locking up some distribution. But it is, I think it's the first full length documentary that goes behind the scenes of what a family experiences. And I'm very hopeful that people will see it because that will shed a light. And if there's a way to utilize that with the Saving tiny Hearts, I think it can help tap into that, and that's some markets for you guys.

 

- Definitely check it out, I love it. They're wonderful, just very Hamish people. Very kind people.

 

- I think that pretty much wraps it up. Just wanna really get people aware of Saving tiny Hearts because it's so near and dear to me. And a couple of years ago we did an album. Has Anthem been sending you money?

 

- Yeah, it's like clockwork. It's out of Canada I believe, correct?

 

- Yeah, they are Canadian company.

 

- We get emails every so often. We just got one the other day of, we found you through Paul Cardall and I believe it's through the disk as well. We get kind of a lot many a year from that. And always just kind of things and it's usually just maybe a small donation that companies and more just kindness. We met through Paul Cardall, we love his music and wish you guys be best, and things like that. Very nice .

 

- Pennies add up?

 

- They do. The disc itself it's still selling cause we're so regularly. And we love it, so that's wonderful, I can't tell you how I appreciate everything.

 

- Yeah, well, if people want to know more, again, go to savingtinyhearts.org, learn more about this. You got to get to one of these GALAs. Cause it's my favorite. My favorite GALA.

 

- You need to get up there next time. Next is in October 21st, I think we have plenty on that. But can I plug about our tournament in December?

 

- Oh, yeah, good, good. I was thinking it was like right around the corner. But if it's in December will be--

 

- December 5th. December 5th Online Charity Poker Tournament. It's on our website, the registration is there. All of the money will to the course, it's our replacement of the GALA this year. But it's gonna be awesome. It's an online, it's all virtual. So if anybody enjoys playing, there's cash prizes, It's a pretty happy sum for the winners. So if there's poker players that there were non poker players that like sick kids were your guys. So--

 

- That's brilliant because you can't go to a GALA but you guys did a very successful poker at the GALA and now you bring it virtually. I mean, people are around and playing Solitaire and Texas hold 'em anyways--

 

- It is, it's a Texas hold 'em tournament online and it's an app that you can download on your phone. I think we have we have a company actually helping to put it together for us. They are who monitors actually it helps them provide it for us. But there are, I think we're doing Zoom meetings . So there will be some interpersonal communication on it too.

 

- Yeah, December 5th.

 

- December 5th, Saturday night, I think at 6:00 P.M. Central is on the website right now, the registration. I think it should do very well. Have you ever been up on a charity tournaments?

 

- I've never played poker in my life.

 

- You wanna play?

 

- It's the culture, it's the religion thing. But at the same time, I'm anyways...

 

- The only poker tournament is turning to everyone thinks around the world series of poker and everyone... It's funny, it's the one type of sport, ESPN type thing you can do that is, you don't really need any athletic policy.

 

- No, no. Just bring some cash and make sure there's not a hole in the pocket

 

- Cash in the computer and you could be in there, but it should be fun. And that's the main thing was to raise money and it should be very well. So we can continue to raise money for congenital heart.

 

- Yeah, it's the best. That's the best place to play poker is when you're doing something for people. That's the way it should be.

 

- Yeah, absolutely.

 

- Wouldn't we dramatically change Vegas if it was all for the children?

 

- That's what tells .

 

- No, they don't. Hey, well, thanks for being on here, Brian. Tell Francie hello.

 

- Well, thank you and Gina, and please the family. Say hello to everyone. Hope everyone's doing well for these very unique time. Things settled down here next year.

 

- All right, brother, be safe.

 

- I'll be well, talk to you.

 

- That's gonna wrap it up for this episode. Thank you for listening make sure you subscribe to the podcast. If you wanna watch this you can go to my website, paulcardall.com, there are links under the podcast to watch them. And also we have a free song I've never before made available. You can get that by subscribing to my newsletter. We like to give away stuff. So, until next time, we'll see you guys. Bye.